Clock Tower Records

As the pre-eminent forerunners to Chopin's works in the same genres, the Nocturnes of John Field have few rivals for music well known by history but so seldom heard. They were largely inspired by the slow movements of Classical concertos, Mozart above all, as well as opera arias. From them, Field evolved his own firm concept of a form with rich harmonies and gentle dynamics to suggest the night and dreaming, though in fact he began by giving these pieces traditional names such as Pastorale, Serenade and "Romance. He wrote the 18 works not as a set, but over the course of 15 years, rarely completing more than one and never more than three in a single year. Liszt observed in them 'The total absence of everything that looks to effect'. Even when he settled upon Nocturne, Field bestowed upon some of them a qualifying subtitle: 'Cradle Song' (No.6), 'Reverie' (No.7), 'Song Without Words' (No.13), 'Nocturne Pastorale' (No.17), and 'Nocturne characteristique Midi' (No.18). This last Nocturne stands apart from it's companions as a tribute to midday, cast as an Allegro, with a coda in which a chiming clock strikes twelve as quicker notes laugh and dance around the repeated note. As a window on the salons of 19th century Europe, the Nocturnes are taxing neither to play nor to listen to, but they are polished with painstaking finesse, and they demand from the performer all the subtle pianistic guile of Chopin's works: notably a command of rubato to shape the melodies, and the imaginative and technical capacities of a coloristic palette to bring variety without eccentricity to the sequence. Tyler Hay can call upon such talents and skills as critics have recognised in his previous recordings for Piano Classics such as an album devoted to the music of John Ogdon (PCL10132) 'Tyler Hay is a formidable pianist... I believe John Ogdon would be very pleased by these performances of his music' (Fanfare). 'The young pianist Tyler Hay has brilliantly mastered and assimilated these often elusive scores, even to the point where I heretically prefer his interpretations to Ogdon's' (Gramophone).
As the pre-eminent forerunners to Chopin's works in the same genres, the Nocturnes of John Field have few rivals for music well known by history but so seldom heard. They were largely inspired by the slow movements of Classical concertos, Mozart above all, as well as opera arias. From them, Field evolved his own firm concept of a form with rich harmonies and gentle dynamics to suggest the night and dreaming, though in fact he began by giving these pieces traditional names such as Pastorale, Serenade and "Romance. He wrote the 18 works not as a set, but over the course of 15 years, rarely completing more than one and never more than three in a single year. Liszt observed in them 'The total absence of everything that looks to effect'. Even when he settled upon Nocturne, Field bestowed upon some of them a qualifying subtitle: 'Cradle Song' (No.6), 'Reverie' (No.7), 'Song Without Words' (No.13), 'Nocturne Pastorale' (No.17), and 'Nocturne characteristique Midi' (No.18). This last Nocturne stands apart from it's companions as a tribute to midday, cast as an Allegro, with a coda in which a chiming clock strikes twelve as quicker notes laugh and dance around the repeated note. As a window on the salons of 19th century Europe, the Nocturnes are taxing neither to play nor to listen to, but they are polished with painstaking finesse, and they demand from the performer all the subtle pianistic guile of Chopin's works: notably a command of rubato to shape the melodies, and the imaginative and technical capacities of a coloristic palette to bring variety without eccentricity to the sequence. Tyler Hay can call upon such talents and skills as critics have recognised in his previous recordings for Piano Classics such as an album devoted to the music of John Ogdon (PCL10132) 'Tyler Hay is a formidable pianist... I believe John Ogdon would be very pleased by these performances of his music' (Fanfare). 'The young pianist Tyler Hay has brilliantly mastered and assimilated these often elusive scores, even to the point where I heretically prefer his interpretations to Ogdon's' (Gramophone).
5029365102889
18 Nocturnes
Artist: Field / Hay
Format: CD
New: Available $21.99
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As the pre-eminent forerunners to Chopin's works in the same genres, the Nocturnes of John Field have few rivals for music well known by history but so seldom heard. They were largely inspired by the slow movements of Classical concertos, Mozart above all, as well as opera arias. From them, Field evolved his own firm concept of a form with rich harmonies and gentle dynamics to suggest the night and dreaming, though in fact he began by giving these pieces traditional names such as Pastorale, Serenade and "Romance. He wrote the 18 works not as a set, but over the course of 15 years, rarely completing more than one and never more than three in a single year. Liszt observed in them 'The total absence of everything that looks to effect'. Even when he settled upon Nocturne, Field bestowed upon some of them a qualifying subtitle: 'Cradle Song' (No.6), 'Reverie' (No.7), 'Song Without Words' (No.13), 'Nocturne Pastorale' (No.17), and 'Nocturne characteristique Midi' (No.18). This last Nocturne stands apart from it's companions as a tribute to midday, cast as an Allegro, with a coda in which a chiming clock strikes twelve as quicker notes laugh and dance around the repeated note. As a window on the salons of 19th century Europe, the Nocturnes are taxing neither to play nor to listen to, but they are polished with painstaking finesse, and they demand from the performer all the subtle pianistic guile of Chopin's works: notably a command of rubato to shape the melodies, and the imaginative and technical capacities of a coloristic palette to bring variety without eccentricity to the sequence. Tyler Hay can call upon such talents and skills as critics have recognised in his previous recordings for Piano Classics such as an album devoted to the music of John Ogdon (PCL10132) 'Tyler Hay is a formidable pianist... I believe John Ogdon would be very pleased by these performances of his music' (Fanfare). 'The young pianist Tyler Hay has brilliantly mastered and assimilated these often elusive scores, even to the point where I heretically prefer his interpretations to Ogdon's' (Gramophone).
        
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